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People 9% Happier Joining Each Group
People 9% Happier Joining Each Group

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People Happier Joining Groups

 

A university study scientifically confirmed what we know ... that being part of groups makes people happier.  By how much?  By nine percent for each group they joined.  So 9 plus 9 plus 9 plus you'll be so happy.   It doesn't matter what you do in the group, just be a part of something, everything.  

 

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 join groups with which the individual in question feels that they will be able to identify

Since SWL is known to be a crucial facet of overall subjective wellbeing, the results of the present study suggest that health professionals, therapists, and community workers should perhaps encourage their patients and clients: (1) to join groups with which the individual in question feels that they will be able to identify (e.g., groups involving sports/hobbies that the individual is interested in, or groups promoting values/ideals that are broadly consistent with those of the individual), and; (2) to enhance/maintain their identification with groups of which they are already members. Achieving the latter does not necessarily need to be overly complex or costly: Knight et al. (2010) found that both group identification and SWL were enhanced for elderly care-home residents who were able to make collective decisions regarding how to decorate their living-space (versus those who were not).

 

thinking more about one’s group life could have significant benefits for one’s overall sense of wellbeing

Overall, our findings suggest that thinking more about one’s group life (and perhaps putting a plan into action in order to enhance it) could have significant benefits for one’s overall sense of wellbeing. While this conclusion might appear rather intuitive to many, this is probably because it taps into knowledge that is deep within all of us, but which we often risk forgetting because of the hectically paced and achievement-focused nature of modern life: that to be your best self, you tend to require the support of others.